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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
, not just in china, but also in the asean countries. >> the industry engineer -- the engineering industry is expecting high turnover. experts are optimistic the upward trend will continue next year. they are hoping the global demand will continue to keep the eurozone crisis at bay. >> to the markets. worries about the future of the german economy weighed on markets. we have this a bit from the frankfurt stock exchange. -- this update from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the dax closed down at the highest level since five years, the day before. some profit-taking. shares have been dragged down by concerns that the german economy might cool down pretty soon. the ifo institute lowered its growth expectations for the german economy. the federal reserve seems to be quite pessimistic. looking at the u.s. economy, the fed thinks that the unemployment rate will stay very high next year. >> let's take a quick look at some market numbers. the dax closed at 7569. the euro stoxx 50 ended the day just a tad down. the dow jones is currently going down over 1/2 of 1%. >> hong fighting broke out in the
the results of that in around about 30 minutes. >>> and china and india secretary growth slowed in november. analysts say china and india's nonmanufacturing team expected to improve thanks to a hiring boost in the mainland as well as strong new orders in india. at the same time, china's new leadership, as we pointed out, has laid out some fresh directives. >> these are some pretty sweeping reforms making china's famously inefficient bureaucracy more efficient. it's an effort to "win the confidence and the support of the people" as public backlash rose against the special treatment of politicians. so a new list of dos and don't's for chinese leaders. on the do side, cut down on giving face. the art of extreme flattery or reverence, which results in some very long meetings and speeches. keep them short and cut down on the lavish feasts. he's also encouraging more travel to rural parts of the country where the real problems are. on the don't's side, stop the empty talk. in china, niceties are often more formal and exaggerated than west. another one is don't stop traffic. if you've ever been to
for the group. he was promoted second-in-command earlier this year. >>> back to the economy now, china apparently going on an american spending spree. a chinese company agreed to buy a big chunk of insurance giant aig for more than $4 billion after the company got a huge bailout during the u.s. financial crisis. that is not the only bargain that china is picking up from u.s. taxpayers lately. stuart varney on this morning, head of "varney & company" on fox business network. good morning, stuart. good to see you. >> good morning, martha. martha: they're gobbling up our assets in many ways . what do you make of it. >> they are spending the money they have got buying american assets cheap. you mentioned aig. a chinese company is paying $4 billion for aig's plane leasing business. aig remember got $189 billion as a bailout fund that was back in september of 2008. the taxpayers still are the largest shareholder in aig. we sold the plane leasing business to china cheap. second item, a 123 batteries, americans taxpayers gave that company $249 million in grants and another 250 million in tax s
to end the civil war in syria. now, remember, both russia and china have blocked u.n. attempts to force out the assad regime. now the russians say they are willing to meet with the syrian opposition. it could open the door for real u.n. action on the ground, action that could mean american involvement. we've got more details in a live report in just a minute. >>> but also, russia's president formally saying no to americans who want to adopt russian children. it is a heartbreaking development for hundreds of americans who are trying to adopt children from russian orphana orphanages. that is happening right now. president vladimir putin signed the adoption ban today. sadly, more than 50 americans who were in the final stages of adopting russian children, they are not going to be able to. and while those families certainly hoping that they're going to allow these adoptions to go through, the country's child rights commissioner says that those kids are going to stay in russia. so why are the russians doing this? the ban is considered a payback of sorts for an american law that was passed tw
quite good. it indicates that the economy in china is expanding again. that means that german companies can hope for new orders from china again, and the markets here can hope for new chinese money to be invested soon into german assets. >> let's take a quick look at some market numbers. the dax ended the day almost 1/2 of 1% up. the euro stoxx 50 closed up at 2582. the dow jones is currently going down about 1/4 of 1%. the euro is trading $1.3660. we turn our attention to syria, where the human cost of the civil war is not limited to loss and destruction inside the country. some half a million summer -- syrians are refugees in neighboring countries. >> for those studying abroad in europe, the anxiety about the safety of their loved ones can beat all consuming -- can be all-consuming. >> this man is torn between remaining where he is and returning to war-ravaged syria. he has been studying medicine in germany for five years and is now doing his residency. he is having trouble concentrating on his professional career. his family can no longer support him financially. that means he spends
it varies by market. we saw significant growth in asia, particularly in china, double digit growth even though supply was growing fast. what we saw in europe and the u.s., we saw supply growth was restrained because there wasn't bank finance and there still isn't which means rev par is growing 6%, 7%, 8%. so it's been quite a strong market and total revenues have grown, as well. demand has grown, we've seen a robust business for the last three years and we've grown highway patrol ahead of the market which is something we try to do. >> i note that you're still expanding, as one would maybe anticipate now and asia is still a very important market. how much expansion are you doing there? >> well, the u.s. is our biggest market, about 60%. china is about 10% of our business. it's about 30% of our clients. for our companies, we have about 11% or 12% of the total pipeline in the world and effectively 30% of that is china. so china is now our second biggest market. is between -- let me get the years right. between '09 and '11, our business doubled there from $1 billion to $2 billion a year. it
with a bunch of allies who supported him. >> i've been reading kissinger's book on china, but he raises's broader question which is important. unfathomable as it is to americans there are parts of the world where they do not believe in alienable rights, right? they don't believe in human rights in the way that we do. >> exactly. and when we try to impose it on them they consider it a violation of their sovereignty. >> exactly. >> china feels that way often. russia, same thing. how far do we go in promoting human rights? the trade off that we'll get here. the law gets passed and human rights violators in russia can't come year and now 1,000 children don't come to the united states and people who want them don't get them. >> my personal view, no. they're glad to take our money and they've long had to put their money overseas, but they do not want human rights promotion and we've seen that inside russia and we've seen that against the crockdown on the internet and this is just the latest interaction of the series of things going back for more than a year against the political opposition an
? >> by the way, on that china point, wind energy relies on precious metals, rare either metals and china is the chief production of that. some analysts say we'll be more reliant as we go more and more wind power, more reliant on the chinese mining industry to get rare earth metals that we need, rare earth metals. sandra: what are we doing here? the taxpayers have got to question this. this is their hard-earned dollars at work. the vetting process by the obama administration has not been all that great when investing in these companies. >> no. we've seen 80% of companies had ties with democratic donors with obama, connections, cronyism. wind produces 2.3% of the electricity. 1.3% of the global electricity. this is something that is, this was the, energy of the future back in the 1970s, 35 years ago. and it hasn't produced. every year they extend, not every year but extend the production tax credits for the wind power and the bottom line is, the wind power, always say prosperity is just around the corner. self-reliance is just around the corner. it doesn't happen. whoo we're seeing more an
? the chinese and russians don't help us on sanctions. they have been ineffective because china that dan. you know, when you look at it, everything that we have tried after the bush years has been a failure. now, during the bush years in the early part of that administration, it puts real financial squeeze on the regime. but then they drop it because they have this fantasy that if we can just sit down one more time with the north koreans, suddenly we will have a deal that will make all this go away. it is not how the world works. the north koreans are getting better each time out launching missiles and setting off nuclear explosions. >> on that note, how realistic do you think it is? and how soon do you think it would be that they would be able to i'm one of these long-range missiles with a nuclear warhead? >> that is the real question. this last missile test was real important because it showed that they were successful. they got it up into the atmosphere. it can go a long way to the united states. now, if they perfect nuclear explosions and start miniaturizing it, being able to put it on a
with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in, it's not only squandered but the nightmare begins. so it's heartbreaking. >> did you want to comment? >> we see it as a lost opportunity. there's a lot of lost opportunities in the 20th 20th century, in march 5, 1965, when stall yip dies, the stove yet leaders reach out the united states and talk about endin
in essence would serve as sanctions on iran but the point is that china needs to be pressured to stop the loophole in the system internationally that is being created to keep iran from the centrifuge program, and that effort overtime has had tremendous success, and with more and more sanctions it has been more successful. more purchase is stopped, more interdictions and more trouble for iran to make progress on the gas centrifuge program. >> in terms of the nonproliferation program, and david is emphasizing some of the holes that exist particularly in the export controls and the lack of enforcement of existing sanctions legislation what is your assessment of the u.s. nonproliferation program or what can be done and should be done? >> when you hear the sanctions, those are all the things we try to do. and so, there are four things that can be done to force things to have better training in the region if you will, but we also need to look at the demand side as well. what drives the countries to proliferate and then how do you also built in that notion of a non-proliferation, how do you
. but competitors in china are, rush show were trading on a daily basis. -- my competitors in china and russia work training. this is a position of irritation of a triple jump. i was like a robot in the sense that everything i was doing, the hours i was putting in it, the morning, the afternoon, the evening, i trained all they basically. my first session, 10:00, i was basically of the rank by nine and my last session would be at 6:00-6:30. then i would go to the gym. i look back, no wonder i was in really good shape. >> where did that drive? how did that drive? where do you get that drive? >> we were talking earlier about the role of parents. when you had mentioned the tiger mom or the tiger parents, we did not have tiger parents. they were there to support me and be there in times when i needed a push culminated motivation. it is just one of those things when you have a passion and a vision. you do not see anything else. that is what drives you every day. >> you just got engaged. are you going to be a tiger mom. [laughter] >> looking at the way i was raised with a set of rules and just the way my
business as usual with china and goes into panama december 1989. the american people loved it it was our backyard. me noriega was the news dahlin. and that is another untold story. and with the doctor of the photos it breaks my heart personally send a the veteran we don't take advantage of the possibilities with the soviet union reprivatize with russia and then 43, and it is natalie squandered but it is heartbreaking during that period. >> it is a lost opportunity. i agree. >> march 5, 1953 when stalin died the soviet leader's reach out to the united states at that point* but eisenhower had a great speech but then dallas refutes it then they take a hard-line. >> we had a lot of chances.
lessons in your book -- this may sound like a stretch, the people who live in china. i mean, this government's, it is -- you know, i don't know whether you call it -- certainly there is not the openness. well would you say to the leaders of china about there future? >> well, i would start by saying that the chinese leaders have drawn lessons from the story. the chinese leaders know this piece of history. of course, there's a similar time in their own history. and they also have studied very carefully the 80's in the end of the soviet union. and one of the decisions that they have made based on studying this piece of history is, they have made contemporary china less totalitarian in the sense that they do make people march in parades and they have abandon ideology in the sense of making people repeat things they don't believe in. and the pressures they put on people are coming in that sense, less. it is a much more subtle system where you are allowed to say some things in some context, but not others. you can talk about corruption, but you may be cannot criticize the party di
jimmy carter is in china this week where today he met with the new communist leader to discuss a wide range of controversial chinese policies. with him, of course, roseland carter as well. >>> in pakistan hundreds of students rallied against naming a college against malala, the activist school girl that was shot by a taliban gunman in october. according to pakistani government officials, students are concerned that naming the college after malala will cause a security threat to them. >>> in oregon today officials say that jacob tyler roberts, the 22-year-old gunman who killed two people and seriously wounded a 15-year-old girl before taking his own life in an oregon mall on tuesday knew none of his victims. police say that roberts acted alone, using a semi-automatic rifle that he had stolen the day before. the day before the shooting rampage at that crowded mall. roberts had no significant criminal record. authorities said other than a few speeding tickets. >>> that tragedy in oregon is only the latest in a series of mass shugts, and people ask could tighter gun laws have prevented th
to america. right now china is the leading country. russia is certainly in the top 5 with over 700,000 orphans in that country. there's certainly plenty of children who need a loving family here in the united states. >> suarez: how about that side of the story. unicef estimate there is's only about 18,000 russian families looking to adopt children. that's a disproportionate number considering the need for new homes. >> it is. last year alone here in america there were a thousand children adopted from russia. there are many american families, many of whom right now are in the process of adopting these children that are willing, ready, and able to adopt these kids, some of which have severe special needs. so it speaks to the heart of these american families that are willing to adopt these kids and bring them home. the. >> suarez: but there have been unfortunate stories that have gotten a lot of attention here in the united states and back in russia >> does that make things more difficult for your organization and others that are watching international adoptions? >> sure, well, i thin
even have to consider borrowing money from china or anywhere else and we're worried about a a.a.a. credit rating. why should we even have that as an option? we're the richest country in the world, and we put food out everywhere. also, one brief note on the gun laws issue. they're not going to ban a particular type of car because it drove through a crowd. so i don't see how they can target any particular weapon and say it's worse than another. combat loading weapon, you can almost do that as fast as you can pull the trigger also. so it's not a matter of how many rounds you can shoot. it's a matter of an insane person getting a hold of anything -- a knife, a car, anything. so -- guest: keith, and the reality of using guns for whatever illegal purposes oftentimes gets lost into washington, d.c. and the politics. boy, we're going to have to do something. we are going to have a press release, a press conference. there is a second amendment. thankfully the supreme court has recognized it is an individual right and a narrow decision. the one thing i want to go back, small business th
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)